Alford author in autism book visit

Hazel Reeves is pictured  with daughter Imogen Reeves, headteacher James Siddle and some of the school's pupils. Photo by John Crossland.
Hazel Reeves is pictured with daughter Imogen Reeves, headteacher James Siddle and some of the school's pupils. Photo by John Crossland.
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Pupils were able to enjoy the humorous tales of Roar the Little Dinosaur when an Alford author visited their school recently.

Hazel Reeves has penned a series of six colourful stories to inspire and celebrate children with autism after her daughter Imogen was diagnosed with the condition, aged three. The mother of two originally thought of writing the books when her daughter was much younger and called herself ‘a little dinosaur’.

“My daughter would visit me in the night and say ‘roar, roar, roar, I’m a little dinosaur’ and I’d always thought about writing a children’s book, so the idea came from there,” said Hazel.

Hazel created the character of Roar the Little Dinosaur to enable young children to celebrate being unique and children at St Margaret’s School, Withern, near Alford were also to enjoy the stories and share the fun.

“My youngest daughter has high-functioning Autism/Aspergers. It was very difficult to find appropriate books for her that were positive and affirming. There are many glum stories about autism and Roar is about celebrating the positive characteristics and strengths of children with autism,” added Hazel.

You can read more at www.roar-littledinosaur.com and follow Roar the Little Dinosaur on Facebook. The books are available from LDA publishers and Amazon.

The first three books were published in June 2012 and the latest three have just been launched, also by LDA.

“I approached lots of publishers at first and it took some time but the LDA really enjoyed the concept and wanted three to start with and now another three have just been produced,” explained Hazel.

And the little green dinosaur looks set to be created into a puppet to help mothers, teachers, Hazel and much more engage with their children, not just those with autism but all can enjoy the pleasant and amusing stores.

“Although Roar is designed for children with autism, with the traits he possesses and how the stories are structured, other children really do enjoy them,” added Hazel.

Roar has also been reviewed and endorsed by children, parents, professionals and Autism organisations around the world.

“My books were recently shortlisted for the prestigious Education Resource Awards,” Hazel added.