Skegness pothole problem a ‘priority’ for extra funding

Councillors and highways officers pictured before Friday's road inspection in Skegness, from left, highways officer Andy Ratcliffe, executive councillor for highways Coun William Webb, Coun Dick Edginton, Coun  Mark Smith and Coun Ken Milner.
Councillors and highways officers pictured before Friday's road inspection in Skegness, from left, highways officer Andy Ratcliffe, executive councillor for highways Coun William Webb, Coun Dick Edginton, Coun Mark Smith and Coun Ken Milner.
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Strong suggestions that Skegness will receive additional funding to resolve its ‘terrible’ pothole problems have been made after the town’s county councillors escalated the issue.

Coun Ken Milner and Coun Mark Smith took senior highways figures on a tour around some of the town’s pothole black spots yesterday, to demonstrate the need for added investment.

Pothole inspection.

Pothole inspection.

Having heard repeated complaints from the town’s residents, they hoped executive member for highways Coun William Webb would prioritise Skegness when it came to deciding where £6 million of additional government funding for road repairs and maintenance would be spent.

Speaking after the meeting Coun Milner said: “Having seen the state of the roads in Skegness Coun Webb says they will now be a priority.”

Several projects had already been given the go ahead for completion before Easter, including Berry Way, Wainfleet Road, Grantham Drive and Richmond Drive, near the one way system.

Further repairs planned for Lumley Avenue, Lincoln Road, Burgh Road and the junction near The Ship on Castleton Boulevard have also been authorised but will not proceed until after the summer to avoid worsening congestion during the busy tourist season.

Coun Milner added: “The roads are all going to be repaired by the end of the year but we don’t want it when the holidaymakers come because it will only worsen the traffic situation for everyone.”

Additional improvements for Beresford Avenue and outside Seathorne Primary School could also take place after Friday’s inspection demonstrated the dire need for investment.

It is believed these roads were built by German prisoners of war during 1940s using rather basic construction methods and have not been brought up to date since.

This has left them vulnerable to the effects of the weather, which have been particularly corrosive due to last year’s wet summer followed by the recent cold snap.

Both Skegness councillors were pleased to have achieved a positive outcome for the town and its residents after much lobbying on their behalf.

Coun Smith said: “We’ve prioritsed the areas that residents have brought to our attention and through a lot of lobbying behind the scenes it looks like they should happen.

“We’ve both been very parochial in standing up for Skegness, which is what we were elected for.”

The announcement follows numerous complaints raised by residents on social media and at town council meetings, after fears grew the state of roads in the town could cause a serious accident.