Teenage music entrepreneur set to address Westminster

Pictured from left Amman Ahmed, Marcus Simpson, Anne-Marie Morris MP, Abdul Khan, George Quann-Barnett. Photo supplied.
Pictured from left Amman Ahmed, Marcus Simpson, Anne-Marie Morris MP, Abdul Khan, George Quann-Barnett. Photo supplied.

A YOUNG Skegness entrepreneur has been invited to the Houses of Parliament to speak about the challenges and opportunities in setting up a new company in the UK.

Founder of Launchpad Records Ltd, 19-year-old George Quann-Barnett, has worked alongside such illustrious names as grime MC and producer Wiley, Tre Mission and Dot Rotten in his short stint in the music industry.

He will meet with MPs at an All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) to discuss the possibility of a national investment fund for start-up businesses to assist other aspirational young entrepreneurs such as himself.

With youth unemployment at record levels and university fees higher than ever, George believes financial support for young businessmen and women could offer a viable alternative for those looking to progress their careers outside of the traditional avenues into work.

He said: “Starting your own business is tough at the best of times but with the right guidance and advice from those who’ve already been there and done that, it can be a real alternative.

“Of course you need the drive and determination to succeed, not to mention a great idea, but with costly university fees and lower employment prospects, entrepreneurialism can make a fantastic difference in getting Britain working again now.”

George was a key signatory in a letter sent to Prime Minister David Cameron last month recommending that small scale loans could be offered to start-up businesses on comparable terms to student financing.

Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group, also signed the letter as a keen advocate of supporting and mentoring young entrepreneurs to help get their businesses off the ground.

He helped to establish Virgin Media Pioneers, an online community of young businessmen, including George, to help provide the vital assistance in getting their projects up and running.

Sir Richard said: “While global economic gloom has closed the door to many young people who might have entered into traditional professions, thousands of them are looking upon this as an opportunity.

“They’re seizing the chance to make a job rather than take a job. Positive, enthusiastic and excited by their prospects, these are young people that have our potential to change our country for the better,” he added.