Skegness trials solar-powered Big Belly rubbish bin

David Pocklington, neighbourhood area manager with Ian Bennett, sreet scene supervisor for East Lindsey District Council pictured with the new Big Belly rubbish bin in Skegness.
David Pocklington, neighbourhood area manager with Ian Bennett, sreet scene supervisor for East Lindsey District Council pictured with the new Big Belly rubbish bin in Skegness.

A bin with a solar-powered compactor which crushes down rubbish, has been installed in Skegness for a month long trial.

The high-tech black Big Belly Bin has been put outside The Hildreds Shopping Centre today next to The Skegness Town Council notice board.

Skegness now boasts its first computerised bin in line with many of the other towns across the UK.

Standing taller than the blue round bins nearby but not much larger than the usual black style, the pull down handle unit, can take eight times the normal amount of rubbish thanks to its compactor.

Big Belly’s account manager Mark Cosgrave, who installed the bin this afternoon, said this first bin, would hopefully gather enough data to prove the savings it can make to the district council.

“The council could save £86 per week, per bin,” he said.

Although, they will cost £1,000 a year per bin and would be loaned to the council on a five year basis, if the project is given the go-ahead, it is hoped the savings would outweigh the costs.

The bins are driven by solar energy and just eight hours of daylight can provide enough power for a month.

And Neighbourhood Area Manager for the south, David Pocklington, also present at its installation, thought it was a ‘good idea’ for the town and hoped people would get to use it.

“I think it’s a very good idea and its about investigating the costs during this trial period,” he said.

130 of these bins have been rolled out in Nottingham City Centre and the public, although hesitant at first to use them, soon got used to the idea despite initial fears about touching germs when pulling down the handle.

“We investigated this and it was found that there was no more bacteria on the handle then there was on the handle to the bank or the cash point,” said Mark Cosgrave.

For more information visit www.bigbellysolar.co.uk

-What do you think about the bin? Email amy.gallivan@jpress.co.uk