QEGS Alford celebrate major milestone

Some of the 16 pupils who took part in the production on the life of Queen Elizabeth I, with the two cut-outs.
Some of the 16 pupils who took part in the production on the life of Queen Elizabeth I, with the two cut-outs.

Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar School in Alford celebrated a major milestone last week, marking 450 years since the institution was opened.

The official anniversary of the school’s establishment took place on Friday, March 18, and it was marked in style by pupils and staff members through a variety of 
activities and celebrations.

I think that it meant a lot to the pupils

Miss Angie Francis

The school was founded in 1566 by Francis Spanning, a rich merchant, and was originally thought to have 
been based above the porch of nearby St Wilfrid’s 
Church.

Lord Burghley, William Cecil - who was the Lord Treasurer of England and the most powerful man in the country - made 
representations to Queen Elizabeth I in 1576 and a free grammar school was 
officially instituted.

The big day itself was celebrated with a small production on the life of Queen Elizabeth I, which 
was performed by 16 pupils.

A banquet lunch was held in the hall, accompanied by 
Elizabethan music 
performed by the school’s chamber choir.

The school also buried a time capsule, which is to be opened on the 500th anniversary in 2066. Items inside the capsule include present day material from the school such as prospectuses and photographs, and gadgets which are likely 
to be obsolete in 50 years time - such as video tapes and USB memory 
sticks containing short films created by the pupils.

The time capsule also contains journal entries from current pupils about their hopes and dreams for the future. Pupils will be welcomed back in 2066 for the unearthing of the capsule to see 
if they achieved their
 goals.

Artistic cutouts of Queen 
Elizabeth I were designed by four pupils - Ciara Hickinbottom, Monty Radford, Rosa Smith and Sarah Tutt - and have been displayed around the 
school.

The artwork was inspired by the Baron’s Trail in Lincoln, and head teacher Angie Francis hopes that more will be created and placed around the school in the 
coming months.

A large ‘450’ art piece, containing the names of all current pupils, was also made to mark the occasion.

Miss Francis told the Leader that the school 
had celebrated in style 
to mark the incredible milestone, and that it had instilled pride 
into all current pupils.

Ms Francis said: “I think that it meant a lot to the pupils, who were very proud of the 
school’s historical connection with Queen Elizabeth I.”