Mobile chemotherapy service gives treatment closer to home

At the open day for Skegness Mobile Chemotherapy Unit (MCU): patient David Whitmore, Mike Hardy (Skegness Lions), Tony Tye (Chairman of Skegness and District Chamber of Commerce), Skegness Mayor Coun Dick Edginton and Katrina Simpson (Deputy Sister MCU).
At the open day for Skegness Mobile Chemotherapy Unit (MCU): patient David Whitmore, Mike Hardy (Skegness Lions), Tony Tye (Chairman of Skegness and District Chamber of Commerce), Skegness Mayor Coun Dick Edginton and Katrina Simpson (Deputy Sister MCU).

Anybody who has undergone chemotherapy will know how drained they can feel afterwards.

For those receiving treatment, the journey to and from hospital can be very tiring.

But thanks to the fundraising efforts of local people, a charity has now made it possible for people to be treated without the need to travel miles from home, as a mobile chemotherapy unit comes to Skegness.

The unit is provided by the charity Hope for Tomorrow and is operated by trained NHS staff.

Skegness Lions have been busy raising money for the charity, along with other groups in the area.

As part of Chemotherapy in the Community Week, the charity held an open day and the unit parked outside Hildrid’s Shopping Centre so that people could learn more about its service.

Dawn Osko, regional fundraiser for Hope for Tomorrow, said: “For people having chemotherapy it can often mean travelling 40 miles to Lincoln and you can feel very tired after having chemo so people will usually need someone to drive them or take time off work.

“This unit means that people can have treatment close to their home. It is a different experience than going to hospital. People feel it is a calmer atmosphere and up to four patients can be treated at a time.”

Skegness patient Merobi Bennett, who has been receiving treatment at the unit, said: “The mobile chemotherapy unit means a lot to people living in rural areas. The staff are wonderful.”

A unit costs £260,000 for the first three years and then £15,000 per year to keep it on the road.

Dawn added: “We do not receive any government funding so we have to raise funds for the units.”

The chemotherapy unit is usually based outside Skegness Hospital when it visits on Fridays.