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Historically significant gravestone restored

Pictured at the restored headstone of Adelaide Heanley, the second cousin of the 19th century diarist the Rev Francis Kilvert, (from left) Stuart Chambers, Jean Brimson, Tony Laverick, Alan Brimson, Ray Taylor and Mark Caudwell.

Pictured at the restored headstone of Adelaide Heanley, the second cousin of the 19th century diarist the Rev Francis Kilvert, (from left) Stuart Chambers, Jean Brimson, Tony Laverick, Alan Brimson, Ray Taylor and Mark Caudwell.

A Skegness funeral director has helped a charitable society restore and preserve a piece of history linked to a 19th century diarist.

Frank Wood and Sons supported The Kilvert Society to rescue the headstone of Adelaide Maria Heanley, nee Cholmeley, the second 
cousin of the Rev Francis Kilvert.

Wiltshire-born Kilvert was a country parson who kept a diary from 1870 to 1879, serving as curate in Clyro, Radnorshire, Wales.

Adelaide died from Scarlet fever in March 1879, aged 24, was buried in Croft and is often mentioned in his work.

The society was founded in 1948 to foster an interest in the Rev Francis Kilvert, his work, his diary and the countryside he loved.

Society secretary Alan Brimson said: “When The Kilvert Society visited Croft in 2010 it found the memorial gravestone of young Addie sadly in pieces among the undergrowth.

“The policy of the society is that they are the custodians of memorials to those who feature in ‘Kilvert’s Diary’ and strive to maintain them for future generations and they were determined to fully restore that of Adelaide Maria Cholmeley.

“This has now been achieved with outstanding support on this project from Frank Wood and Sons, Funeral Directors of Skegness, whose Stuart Chambers has been fully supportive in the restoration 
and the company has made a significant financial contribution as did Mark Caudwell of Stackholme End, a direct descendant of the Heanleys, whose generous donation enabled the project to be finally completed.”

Addie’s mother, also called Adelaide, was the daughter of a brother of Mr Kilvert’s father.

She had married Col Montague Cholmeley, of Wainfleet, and the 27th Infantry Regiment.

Young Addie was born in India. She married Charles Heanley, of Croft, in August 1874 and settled to married life at Clough House 
Farm, near Gibraltar 
Point.

She had three children. Her youngest son, Thomas Walter Heanley, lived to be 100 years of age and died in 
1978.

Members of the Kilvert Society gathered recently at Croft to celebrate the restoration.

 

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