Lincolnshire Bomber Command Memorial Trust unveils ambitious Lincoln spire plan at launch reception near Spilsby

0
Have your say

The design of a lasting memorial to the tens of thousands of men and women who died serving for Bomber Command was unveiled in an East Kirkby ceremony last night (Thursday).

The three-piece ‘Spire of Names’ design by Walter Jack will rise 164 feet into the air above Lincoln once complete.

An artist's impression of the memorial spire. Photo supplied.

An artist's impression of the memorial spire. Photo supplied.

It was chosen by the Lincolnshire Bomber Command Memorial Trust from a shortlist of three designs - and will honour the names of the 25,000 aircrew who lost their lives.

The names of each of the men will make up the structure of the spire, which will be constructed out of the same material as the iconic Angel of the North near Newcastle.

The launch event, which was held at the Lincolnshire Aviation heritage Centre in East Kirkby, west of Spilsby, attracted hundreds of dignitaries from across the county - all of whom were there to support the inspirational proposals and discover the chosen design for the memorial.

The Trust’s Nicky Barr said: “It was a huge night for us. We had 300 guests including top members of the forces - who have been incredibly supportive of what we’re doing.

Dignitaries beneath the Lancaster bomber 'Just Jane' at the launch on Thursday night. Photo by David Nutt.

Dignitaries beneath the Lancaster bomber 'Just Jane' at the launch on Thursday night. Photo by David Nutt.

“There was also a huge number of people from across the county, including three Bomber Command veterans.”

She added that councils across the county had also been incredibly supportive to date, many of whom had representatives at Thursday night’s launch.

Once complete the spire will stand on Canwick Hill in Lincoln - its spire designed to reflect those of Lincoln Cathedral.

Nicky added that the spire would ‘link’ with Lincoln Cathedral, which for many pilots was the last sight of home they had before heading into enemy airspace, and the first indication that they were truly safe upon their return.

It is hoped the structure will last for at least 125 years.

The site will also feature a visitor centre and gardens containing soil taken from each of the 27 Bomber Command stations active at the time. Each of the nationalities who fought for Bomber Command will also be represented.

And the visitor centre will also feature an interactive muesum that will tell the “whole collective story” of the war involving Bomber Command, including the efforts of Bomber Command’s many foreign aircrew and the effect of the raids on Germany at sites like of Dresden.

For more information about the project visit www.lincsbombercommandmemorial.com.

The Trust is on the lookout for further donations towards the project. All help will be gratefully received.