Knitters in Skegness create 140 poppies for church display

Angie Fox and her group have patiently created out of wool 140 poppies for the pillars of St Matthews Church.
Angie Fox and her group have patiently created out of wool 140 poppies for the pillars of St Matthews Church.
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After being inspired by the stunning wave of poppies at Lincoln Castle, a group of ladies have created their own tribute of remembrance in Skegness.

Nifty knitter Angie Fox and her group have patiently created out of wool 140 poppies for the pillars of St Matthew’s Church - to mark each of the names on the cenotaph in the church grounds.

Angie (74) was joined by her bowling friend Janet Walker, sister Brenda Joy and sister-in-law Liz Gowling to knit and crochet both the red poppies and also white poppies to symbolise peace.

She said: “The idea came about in the summer from the cascades of poppies in Lincoln.

“I love knitting so I started knitting about 30 poppies.

“I then went to the cenotaph at St Matthew’s and counted the names on it and I found about 140 names. I checked that with the Royal British Legion who believe that is correct.”

She, like many people, has personal reasons for marking the Remembrance.

“My great-uncle was in the Somme and was killed in France, my brother was in the army and my dad was in the war in Burma.”

On Friday (Oct 14) the poppies were put on display in the church.

Angie said: “The hardest part was putting the poppies onto the wire to go up on the pillars.

“We’ve attached them onto chicken wire to be able to fix them up.

“I just thought to do this display would be a nice idea and I like doing things like this.

“We’ve been knitting about four or five poppies a day”

She has also been busy with some of the group knitting beanie hats for the children in the Skegness Junior Marching Band, which she set up last year.

The band will be taking part in the town’s Remembrance parade on Sunday November 13.

Retired Angie, who ran the Friskney Aristocrats band 30 years ago, said: “I like to keep myself busy. I think it’s important to keep doing things.”

Remembrance poppies have been used since 1921 to commemorate those in the forces who died in conflict.

The red poppies were inspired by the famous First World War poem ‘In Flanders Fields,’ which references the red poppies which grew over the graves of fallen soldiers.

Next month sees the start of the Royal British Legion’s annual Poppy Appeal, 
which raises vital funds to support the armed forces community.