Full steam ahead for restoration project in Skegness

Some of the volunteers from the Lincolnshire Coast Light Railway Historical Vehicles Trust, who will be working on Jurassic's restoration. (pictured at the LCLR's 50th Anniversary celebration in Skegness). Left to right: Chris Bates (founding member); Mike Gott; Graham Newall, Paul Walkinshaw (treasurer), Astling Evison, Richard Shepherd (chairman), David Enefer, Calvin Roberts, Jim Smith.
Some of the volunteers from the Lincolnshire Coast Light Railway Historical Vehicles Trust, who will be working on Jurassic's restoration. (pictured at the LCLR's 50th Anniversary celebration in Skegness). Left to right: Chris Bates (founding member); Mike Gott; Graham Newall, Paul Walkinshaw (treasurer), Astling Evison, Richard Shepherd (chairman), David Enefer, Calvin Roberts, Jim Smith.
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More than a century after it first took to the tracks, an iconic locomotive is set once again for full steam ahead - thanks to a £43,600 grant.

The team of volunteers at the Lincolnshire Coast Light Railway Historical Vehicles Trust in Skegness are celebrating the grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

August Bank Holiday 1985: Jurassic leaving the original terminus of the LCLR at North Sea Lane, Humberston, on her final run.

August Bank Holiday 1985: Jurassic leaving the original terminus of the LCLR at North Sea Lane, Humberston, on her final run.

It will make a dream become a reality to return steam engine ‘Jurassic’ back to working order.

The engine was built in 1903 by Peckett and Sons for a lime works at Southam in Warwickshire, before being sold to the Lincolnshire Coast Light Railway in 1961. There she took trains of tourists to the beach from holiday camps near Cleethorpes before the line closed in 1985. After its closure, the line was moved to Skegness Water Leisure Park and since then Jurassic has been kept in storage needing an overhaul to return her to her former glory.

The funding means that once restored the engine will be able to take passengers by train on a trip around the heritage railway at the Park from next year, bringing to life the story of how narrow gauge railways were able to reach remote rural areas before roads and modern motor vehicles were developed.

Interpretation boards, leaflets and a video will help tell the story.

The Trust’s spokesman, John Chappell, said: “This is truly wonderful news – a game-changer in the development of our collection telling the little-known story of a form of transport which changed the way we work and live in Lincolnshire and beyond. Having Jurassic in steam in the Park to take people for a ride on the Lincolnshire Coast Light Railway will encourage far more people to become involved.”

“Her curvaceous lines, long elegant chimney, shiny brass dome and diminutive wheels, have always made her a great favourite with the public and her return to service is certain to earn her a whole new generation of fans”.