Artist and children to transform ugly wall

Members of Ingoldmells and Addlethorpe Residents Management Forum at the wall on Queen Elizabeth Playing Field, which is to be repainted after a National Lottery grant, pictured from left, Mike Adams Treasurer, Joy Adams Secretary, Maurice Darnell Chairman, Anthony Hall Vice Chairman
Members of Ingoldmells and Addlethorpe Residents Management Forum at the wall on Queen Elizabeth Playing Field, which is to be repainted after a National Lottery grant, pictured from left, Mike Adams Treasurer, Joy Adams Secretary, Maurice Darnell Chairman, Anthony Hall Vice Chairman

AN EYESORE in the heart of Ingoldmells will be transformed into a bright and colourful piece of community led artwork thanks to a National Lottery grant.

The unsightly, profanity adorned wall at Queen Elizabeth Playing Field is to become a mural painted by Ingoldmells Primary School pupils and the wider community with guidance from a professional artist.

Ingoldmells and Addlethorpe Residents Management Forum identified the wall as a village landmark requiring attention.

Faced with the choice between demolition and securing funding to improve the wall for community use, they chose the latter and applied to the National Lottery, from which they received £3,390.

Forum chairman Maurice Darnel said: “We are very grateful to the National Lottery for their donation which will help us transform a previously unsightly part of our village into something for everyone to enjoy.”

The group have now enlisted the help of James Mayle an artist specialising in large outdoor community projects who met children at Ingoldmells Primary School last Monday to discover what ideas they would like to incorporate in the design.

James said: “The children were extremely excited about it, at the moment it looks pretty awful but hopefully we can brighten it up and encourage more families to use the space.

“The idea is to make it something intergenerational so that all groups of society can get together to make something positive.”

Representatives from Lincolnshire Police also explained the difference between sanctioned art projects such as this one and the unauthorised, illegal defacing of property.

During the session it was decided to paint a huge landscape mural including cities, woodland and sea so that the children would all have a chance to incorporate designs they wanted to paint, such as flowers, boats or buildings.

The wall will be re-rendered by a local builder before James, the young artists and other keen local residents begin the transformation, which is hoped to take place over two to three days next month.

It is hoped that by involving the youngsters in the project they will have a sense of pride in their achievement