Memorial to Boston teenage member of 619 Squadron which launched from RAF Strubby

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A Boston teenager, who died while on a bombing run in Germany, has been immortalised with a memorial unveiled in Austria on the 70th anniversary of the attack.

619 Squadron member Edward Norman, known as Ted, of Hessle Drive, was with the crew of Lancaster LM756 F-Freddy of 619 Squadron Royal Air Force which was shot down on an air raid on April 25, 1945, on the Obersalzberg at Berchtesgaden in Germany.

Back row, from left. Gordon Walker (Rear Gunner), Wilf De Marco (Pilot), Norman Johnston (Navigator), Jack Speers (W/Op).Front row, from left. Arthur Sharman (Bomb Aimer), Edward Norman (Mid Upper Gunner), Fred Cole (Flight Engineer)

Back row, from left. Gordon Walker (Rear Gunner), Wilf De Marco (Pilot), Norman Johnston (Navigator), Jack Speers (W/Op).Front row, from left. Arthur Sharman (Bomb Aimer), Edward Norman (Mid Upper Gunner), Fred Cole (Flight Engineer)

On Friday, April 24, Ted’s nephew Carl Norman, niece Carolyn Rowland and great-nephew Jojo, joined more than 60 people from the UK and Canada along with military leaders and dignitaries from both countries and Austria, in Adnet to witness the unveiling of a new memorial to the entire crew of 619 Squadron.

Mr Norman said: “What I originally thought might be just a small, modest affair, became a much bigger event in reality.

“It took on quite a momentum and we found it was a lot more emotional than we expected it to be.”

He added: “We were very aware that our father, Edward’s brother, would have got a lot more out of it - he was always looking for more information about that day.”

It took on quite a momentum and we found it was a lot more emotional than we expected it to be.

Ted’s nephew Carl Norman

The unveiling included a fly-past by four planes of the Austrian air force and letters sent by Prince Harry and the Canadian Prime Minister.

There was also a simultaneous ceremony in Timmins, Ontario, Canada – birthplace of the Pilot Wilf DeMarco.

Families of the crew were also given pieces of the aircraft as mementos.

Mr Norman added: “One poignant note is that we flew back with ours on Saturday April 25 - the actual 70th anniversary of the raid - and touched down at Stanstead around midday, approximately the same time that the plane would have touched down at Strubby.

From left, Norman Johnston, Fred Cole, Gordon Walker, Wilf De Marco, Arthur Sharman, Jack Speers, Edward (Ted) Norman

From left, Norman Johnston, Fred Cole, Gordon Walker, Wilf De Marco, Arthur Sharman, Jack Speers, Edward (Ted) Norman

“Virtually 70 years to the hour, (part of) LM756 PG-F flew home.”

FACTFILE: Memorial to a teen bomber

Edward Norman was one of six crew members, of which four died in the attack.

The raid, which launched from RAF Strubby, took place a matter of days before the end of the conflict.

Carl Norman, sister Carolyn Rowland and son Jojo next to the memorial.

Carl Norman, sister Carolyn Rowland and son Jojo next to the memorial.

Edward had joined a few months before, and was previously in the reserved occupation of the buying and selling of fruit and vegetables for Alfred Price and Sons.

Adnet, in Austria, is where the Lancaster crashed.

The memorial project has been led by Adnet mayor Wolfgang Auer and 619 Squadron Association supporter Kevin Ruane along with other family, friends and supporters.

The memorial includes parts of the crashed aircraft, both melted down and embedded in the Adnet red marble the base is made of.